sequoia-sq 0.24.0

Command-line frontends for Sequoia
sequoia-sq-0.24.0 is not a library.

A command-line frontend for Sequoia.

Usage

A command-line frontend for Sequoia, an implementation of OpenPGP

Functionality is grouped and available using subcommands.  Currently,
this interface is completely stateless.  Therefore, you need to supply
all configuration and certificates explicitly on each invocation.

OpenPGP data can be provided in binary or ASCII armored form.  This
will be handled automatically.  Emitted OpenPGP data is ASCII armored
by default.

We use the term "certificate", or cert for short, to refer to OpenPGP
keys that do not contain secrets.  Conversely, we use the term "key"
to refer to OpenPGP keys that do contain secrets.

USAGE:
sq [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] <SUBCOMMAND>

FLAGS:
-f, --force
Overwrites existing files

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
--known-notation <NOTATION>...
Adds NOTATION to the list of known notations. This is used when
validating signatures. Signatures that have unknown notations with
the critical bit set are considered invalid.

SUBCOMMANDS:
encrypt      Encrypts a message
decrypt      Decrypts a message
sign         Signs messages or data files
verify       Verifies signed messages or detached signatures
key          Manages keys
keyring      Manages collections of keys or certs
certify      Certifies a User ID for a Certificate
autocrypt    Communicates certificates using Autocrypt
keyserver    Interacts with keyservers
wkd          Interacts with Web Key Directories
armor        Converts binary to ASCII
dearmor      Converts ASCII to binary
inspect      Inspects data, like file(1)
packet       Low-level packet manipulation
help         Prints this message or the help of the given subcommand(s)

Subcommand encrypt

Encrypts a message

Encrypts a message for any number of recipients and with any number of
passwords, optionally signing the message in the process.

The converse operation is "sq decrypt".

USAGE:
sq encrypt [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [--] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-s, --symmetric
Adds a password to encrypt with.  The message can be decrypted with
either one of the recipient's keys, or any password.
--use-expired-subkey
If a certificate has only expired encryption-capable subkeys, falls
back to using the one that expired last

OPTIONS:
--compression <KIND>
Selects compression scheme to use [default: pad]  [possible values:
none, pad, zip, zlib, bzip2]
--mode <MODE>
Selects what kind of keys are considered for encryption.  Transport
select subkeys marked as suitable for transport encryption, rest
selects those for encrypting data at rest, and all selects all
encryption-capable subkeys. [default: all]  [possible values:
transport, rest, all]
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

--recipient-cert <CERT-RING>...
Encrypts for all recipients in CERT-RING

--signer-key <KEY>...
Signs the message with KEY

-t, --time <TIME>
Chooses keys valid at the specified time and sets the signature's
creation time

ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Encrypt a file using a certificate
$ sq encrypt --recipient-cert romeo.pgp message.txt

# Encrypt a file creating a signature in the process
$ sq encrypt --recipient-cert romeo.pgp --signer-key juliet.pgp message.txt

# Encrypt a file using a password
$ sq encrypt --symmetric message.txt

Subcommand decrypt

Decrypts a message

Decrypts a message using either supplied keys, or by prompting for a
password.  Any signatures are checked using the supplied certificates.

The converse operation is "sq encrypt".

USAGE:
sq decrypt [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [--] [FILE]

FLAGS:
--dump
Prints a packet dump to stderr

--dump-session-key
Prints the session key to stderr

-h, --help
Prints help information

-x, --hex
Prints a hexdump (implies --dump)


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

--recipient-key <KEY>...
Decrypts with KEY

--signer-cert <CERT>...
Verifies signatures with CERT

-n, --signatures <N>
Sets the threshold of valid signatures to N. If this threshold is
not reached, the message will not be considered verified. [default:
0]

ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Decrypt a file using a secret key
$ sq decrypt --recipient-key juliet.pgp ciphertext.pgp

# Decrypt a file verifying signatures
$ sq decrypt --recipient-key juliet.pgp --signer-cert romeo.pgp ciphertext.pgp

# Decrypt a file using a password
$ sq decrypt ciphertext.pgp

Subcommand sign

Signs messages or data files

Creates signed messages or detached signatures.  Detached signatures
are often used to sign software packages.

The converse operation is "sq verify".

USAGE:
sq sign [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [--] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-a, --append
Appends a signature to existing signature

-B, --binary
Emits binary data

--detached
Creates a detached signature

-h, --help
Prints help information

-n, --notarize
Signs a message and all existing signatures


OPTIONS:
--merge <SIGNED-MESSAGE>
Merges signatures from the input and SIGNED-MESSAGE

--notation <NAME> <VALUE>
Adds a notation to the certification.  A user-defined notation's
name must be of the form "name@a.domain.you.control.org". If the
notation's name starts with a !, then the notation is marked as
being critical.  If a consumer of a signature doesn't understand a
critical notation, then it will ignore the signature.  The notation
is marked as being human readable.
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

--signer-key <KEY>...
Signs using KEY

-t, --time <TIME>
Chooses keys valid at the specified time and sets the signature's
creation time

ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Create a signed message
$ sq sign --signer-key juliet.pgp message.txt

# Create a detached signature
$ sq sign --detached --signer-key juliet.pgp message.txt

Subcommand verify

Verifies signed messages or detached signatures

When verifying signed messages, the message is written to stdout or
the file given to --output.

When a detached message is verified, no output is produced.  Detached
signatures are often used to sign software packages.

The converse operation is "sq sign".

USAGE:
sq verify [OPTIONS] [--] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information


OPTIONS:
--detached <SIG>
Verifies a detached signature

-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

--signer-cert <CERT>...
Verifies signatures with CERT

-n, --signatures <N>
Sets the threshold of valid signatures to N. If this threshold is
not reached, the message will not be considered verified. [default:
0]

ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Verify a signed message
$ sq verify --signer-cert juliet.pgp signed-message.pgp

# Verify a detached message
$ sq verify --signer-cert juliet.pgp --detached message.sig message.txt

SEE ALSO:

If you are looking for a standalone program to verify detached
signatures, consider using sequoia-sqv.

Subcommand key

Manages keys

We use the term "key" to refer to OpenPGP keys that do contain
secrets.  This subcommand provides primitives to generate and
otherwise manipulate keys.

Conversely, we use the term "certificate", or cert for short, to refer
to OpenPGP keys that do not contain secrets.  See "sq keyring" for
operations on certificates.

USAGE:
sq key <SUBCOMMAND>

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information


SUBCOMMANDS:
generate                 Generates a new key
extract-cert             Converts a key to a cert
attest-certifications    Attests to third-party certifications
adopt                    Binds keys from one certificate to another
help
Prints this message or the help of the given subcommand(s)

Subcommand key generate

Generates a new key

Generating a key is the prerequisite to receiving encrypted messages
and creating signatures.  There are a few parameters to this process,
but we provide reasonable defaults for most users.

When generating a key, we also generate a revocation certificate.
This can be used in case the key is superseded, lost, or compromised.
It is a good idea to keep a copy of this in a safe place.

After generating a key, use "sq key extract-cert" to get the
certificate corresponding to the key.  The key must be kept secure,
while the certificate should be handed out to correspondents, e.g. by
uploading it to a keyserver.

USAGE:
sq key generate [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] --export <OUTFILE>

FLAGS:
--can-sign
Adds a signing-capable subkey (default)

--cannot-encrypt
Adds no encryption-capable subkey

--cannot-sign
Adds no signing-capable subkey

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information

--with-password
Protects the key with a password


OPTIONS:
--can-encrypt <PURPOSE>
Adds an encryption-capable subkey. Encryption-capable subkeys can be
marked as suitable for transport encryption, storage encryption, or
both. [default: universal] [possible values: transport, storage,
universal]
-c, --cipher-suite <CIPHER-SUITE>
Selects the cryptographic algorithms for the key [default: cv25519]
[possible values: rsa3k, rsa4k, cv25519]
--expires <TIME>
Makes the key expire at TIME (as ISO 8601). Use "never" to create
keys that do not expire.
--expires-in <DURATION>
Makes the key expire after DURATION. Either "N[ymwd]", for N years,
months, weeks, or days, or "never".
-e, --export <OUTFILE>
Writes the key to OUTFILE

--rev-cert <FILE or ->
Writes the revocation certificate to FILE. mandatory if OUTFILE is
"-". [default: <OUTFILE>.rev]
-u, --userid <EMAIL>...
Adds a userid to the key


EXAMPLES:

# First, this generates a key
$ sq key generate --userid "<juliet@example.org>" --export juliet.key.pgp

# Then, this extracts the certificate for distribution
$ sq key extract-cert --output juliet.cert.pgp juliet.key.pgp

# Generates a key protecting it with a password
$ sq key generate --userid "<juliet@example.org>" --with-password

# Generates a key with multiple userids
$ sq key generate --userid "<juliet@example.org>" --userid "Juliet Capulet"

Subcommand key extract-cert

Converts a key to a cert

After generating a key, use this command to get the certificate
corresponding to the key.  The key must be kept secure, while the
certificate should be handed out to correspondents, e.g. by uploading
it to a keyserver.

USAGE:
sq key extract-cert [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# First, this generates a key
$ sq key generate --userid "<juliet@example.org>" --export juliet.key.pgp

# Then, this extracts the certificate for distribution
$ sq key extract-cert --output juliet.cert.pgp juliet.key.pgp

Subcommand key attest-certifications


Attests to third-party certifications allowing for their distribution

To prevent certificate flooding attacks, modern key servers prevent
uncontrolled distribution of third-party certifications on
certificates.  To make the key holder the sovereign over the
information over what information is distributed with the certificate,
the key holder needs to explicitly attest to third-party
certifications.

After the attestation has been created, the certificate has to be
distributed, e.g. by uploading it to a keyserver.

USAGE:
sq key attest-certifications [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [KEY]

FLAGS:
--all
Attests to all certifications [default]

-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

--none
Removes all prior attestations

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<KEY>
Changes attestations on KEY


EXAMPLES:

# Attest to all certifications present on the key
$ sq key attest-certifications juliet.pgp

# Retract prior attestations on the key
$ sq key attest-certifications --none juliet.pgp

Subcommand key adopt


Binds keys from one certificate to another

This command allows one to transfer primary keys and subkeys into an
existing certificate.  Say you want to transition to a new
certificate, but have an authentication subkey on your current
certificate.  You want to keep the authentication subkey because it
allows access to SSH servers and updating their configuration is not
feasible.

USAGE:
sq key adopt [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] --key <KEY>... [--] [TARGET-KEY]

FLAGS:
--allow-broken-crypto
Allows adopting keys from certificates using broken cryptography

-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-k, --key <KEY>...
Adds the key or subkey KEY to the TARGET-KEY

-r, --keyring <KEY-RING>...
Supplies keys for use in --key.

-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<TARGET-KEY>
Adds keys to TARGET-KEY


EXAMPLES:

# Adopt an subkey into the new cert
$ sq key adopt --keyring juliet-old.pgp --key 0123456789ABCDEF -- juliet-new.pgp

Subcommand keyring

Manages collections of keys or certs

Collections of keys or certficicates (also known as "keyrings" when
they contain secret key material, and "certrings" when they don't) are
any number of concatenated certificates.  This subcommand provides
tools to list, split, join, merge, and filter keyrings.

Note: In the documentation of this subcommand, we sometimes use the
terms keys and certs interchangeably.

USAGE:
sq keyring <SUBCOMMAND>

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information


SUBCOMMANDS:
list      Lists keys in a keyring
split     Splits a keyring into individual keys
join      Joins keys or keyrings into a single keyring
merge     Merges keys or keyrings into a single keyring
filter    Joins keys into a keyring applying a filter
help      Prints this message or the help of the given subcommand(s)

Subcommand keyring list

Lists keys in a keyring

Prints the fingerprint as well one userid for every certificate
encountered in the keyring.

USAGE:
sq keyring list [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# List all certs
$ sq keyring list certs.pgp

# List all certs with a userid on example.org
$ sq keyring filter --domain example.org certs.pgp | sq keyring list

Subcommand keyring split

Splits a keyring into individual keys

Splitting up a keyring into individual keys helps with curating a
keyring.

The converse operation is "sq keyring join".

USAGE:
sq keyring split [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-p, --prefix <FILE>
Writes to files with prefix FILE [defaults to the input filename
with a dash, or "output" if keyring is read from stdin]

ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Split all certs
$ sq keyring split certs.pgp

# Split all certs, merging them first to avoid duplicates
$ sq keyring merge certs.pgp | sq keyring split

Subcommand keyring join

Joins keys or keyrings into a single keyring

Unlike "sq keyring merge", multiple versions of the same key are not
merged together.

The converse operation is "sq keyring split".

USAGE:
sq keyring join [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [FILE]...

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Don't ASCII-armor the keyring

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Sets the output file to use


ARGS:
<FILE>...
Sets the input files to use


EXAMPLES:

# Collect certs for an email conversation
$ sq keyring join juliet.pgp romeo.pgp alice.pgp

Subcommand keyring merge

Merges keys or keyrings into a single keyring

Unlike "sq keyring join", the certificates are buffered and multiple
versions of the same certificate are merged together.  Where data is
replaced (e.g., secret key material), data from the later certificate
is preferred.

USAGE:
sq keyring merge [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [FILE]...

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<FILE>...
Reads from FILE


EXAMPLES:

# Merge certificate updates
$ sq keyring merge certs.pgp romeo-updates.pgp

Subcommand keyring filter

Joins keys into a keyring applying a filter

This can be used to filter keys based on given predicates,
e.g. whether they have a user id containing an email address with a
certain domain.  Additionally, the keys can be pruned to only include
components matching the predicates.

If no filters are supplied, everything matches.

If multiple predicates are given, they are or'ed, i.e. a key matches
if any of the predicates match.  To require all predicates to match,
chain multiple invocations of this command.  See EXAMPLES for
inspiration.

USAGE:
sq keyring filter [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [--] [FILE]...

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-P, --prune-certs
Removes certificate components not matching the filter

--to-cert
Converts any keys in the input to certificates.  Converting a key to
a certificate removes secret key material from the key thereby
turning it into a certificate.
-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
--domain <FQDN>...
Matches on email domain FQDN

--email <ADDRESS>...
Matches on email ADDRESS

--name <NAME>...
Matches on NAME

-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<FILE>...
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Converts a key to a cert (i.e., remove any secret key material)
$ sq keyring filter --to-cert cat juliet.pgp

# Gets the keys with a user id on example.org
$ sq keyring filter --domain example.org keys.pgp

# Gets the keys with a user id on example.org or example.net
$ sq keyring filter --domain example.org --domain example.net keys.pgp

# Gets the keys with a user id with the name Juliet
$ sq keyring filter --name Juliet keys.pgp

# Gets the keys with a user id with the name Juliet on example.org
$ sq keyring filter --domain example.org keys.pgp | \
sq keyring filter --name Juliet

# Gets the keys with a user id on example.org, pruning other userids
$ sq keyring filter --domain example.org --prune-certs certs.pgp

Subcommand certify


Certifies a User ID for a Certificate

Using a certification a keyholder may vouch for the fact that another
certificate legitimately belongs to a user id.  In the context of
emails this means that the same entity controls the key and the email
address.  These kind of certifications form the basis for the Web Of
Trust.

This command emits the certificate with the new certification.  The
updated certificate has to be distributed, preferably by sending it to
the certificate holder for attestation.  See also "sq key
attest-certification".

USAGE:
sq certify [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] <CERTIFIER-KEY> <CERTIFICATE> <USERID>

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-l, --local
Makes the certification a local certification.  Normally, local
certifications are not exported.
--non-revocable
Marks the certification as being non-revocable. That is, you cannot
later revoke this certification.  This should normally only be used
with an expiration.

OPTIONS:
-a, --amount <TRUST_AMOUNT>
Sets the amount of trust.  Values between 1 and 120 are meaningful.
120 means fully trusted.  Values less than 120 indicate the degree
of trust.  60 is usually used for partially trusted.  The default is
120.
-d, --depth <TRUST_DEPTH>
Sets the trust depth (sometimes referred to as the trust level).  0
means a normal certification of <CERTIFICATE, USERID>.  1 means
CERTIFICATE is also a trusted introducer, 2 means CERTIFICATE is a
meta-trusted introducer, etc.  The default is 0.
--expires <TIME>
Makes the certification expire at TIME (as ISO 8601). Use "never" to
create certifications that do not expire.
--expires-in <DURATION>
Makes the certification expire after DURATION. Either "N[ymwd]", for
N years, months, weeks, or days, or "never".  [default: 5y]
--notation <NAME> <VALUE>
Adds a notation to the certification.  A user-defined notation's
name must be of the form "name@a.domain.you.control.org". If the
notation's name starts with a !, then the notation is marked as
being critical.  If a consumer of a signature doesn't understand a
critical notation, then it will ignore the signature.  The notation
is marked as being human readable.
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

-r, --regex <REGEX>...
Adds a regular expression to constrain what a trusted introducer can
certify.  The regular expression must match the certified User ID in
all intermediate introducers, and the certified certificate.
Multiple regular expressions may be specified.  In that case, at
least one must match.

ARGS:
<CERTIFIER-KEY>
Creates the certificate using CERTIFIER-KEY.

<CERTIFICATE>
Certifies CERTIFICATE.

<USERID>
Certifies USERID for CERTIFICATE.


EXAMPLES:

# Juliet certifies that Romeo controls romeo.pgp and romeo@example.org
$ sq certify juliet.pgp romeo.pgp "<romeo@example.org>"

Subcommand autocrypt

Communicates certificates using Autocrypt

Autocrypt is a standard for mail user agents to provide convenient
end-to-end encryption of emails.  This subcommand provides a limited
way to produce and consume headers that are used by Autocrypt to
communicate certificates between clients.

See https://autocrypt.org/

USAGE:
sq autocrypt <SUBCOMMAND>

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information


SUBCOMMANDS:
decode           Reads Autocrypt-encoded certificates
encode-sender    Encodes a certificate into an Autocrypt header
help             Prints this message or the help of the given
subcommand(s)

Subcommand autocrypt decode

Reads Autocrypt-encoded certificates

Given an autocrypt header (or an key-gossip header), this command
extracts the certificate encoded within it.

The converse operation is "sq autocrypt encode-sender".

USAGE:
sq autocrypt decode [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Extract all certificates from a mail
$ sq autocrypt decode autocrypt.eml

Subcommand autocrypt encode-sender

Encodes a certificate into an Autocrypt header

A certificate can be encoded and included in a header of an email
message.  This command encodes the certificate, adds the senders email
address (which must match the one used in the "From" header), and the
senders "prefer-encrypt" state (see the Autocrypt spec for more
information).

The converse operation is "sq autocrypt decode".

USAGE:
sq autocrypt encode-sender [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
--email <ADDRESS>
Sets the address [default: primary userid]

-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

--prefer-encrypt <prefer-encrypt>
Sets the prefer-encrypt attribute [default: nopreference]  [possible
values: nopreference, mutual]

ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Encodes a certificate
$ sq autocrypt encode-sender juliet.pgp

# Encodes a certificate with an explicit sender address
$ sq autocrypt encode-sender --email juliet@example.org juliet.pgp

# Encodes a certificate while indicating the willingness to encrypt
$ sq autocrypt encode-sender --prefer-encrypt mutual juliet.pgp

Subcommand keyserver

Interacts with keyservers

USAGE:
sq keyserver [OPTIONS] <SUBCOMMAND>

FLAGS:
-h, --help    Prints help information

OPTIONS:
-p, --policy <NETWORK-POLICY>
Sets the network policy to use [default: encrypted]  [possible
values: offline, anonymized, encrypted, insecure]
-s, --server <URI>               Sets the keyserver to use

SUBCOMMANDS:
get     Retrieves a key
help    Prints this message or the help of the given subcommand(s)
send    Sends a key

Subcommand keyserver get

Retrieves a key

USAGE:
sq keyserver get [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] <QUERY>

FLAGS:
-B, --binary     Emits binary data
-h, --help       Prints help information
-V, --version    Prints version information

OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>    Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

ARGS:
<QUERY>    Retrieve certificate(s) using QUERY. This may be a
fingerprint, a KeyID, or an email address.

Subcommand keyserver send

Sends a key

USAGE:
sq keyserver send [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help       Prints help information
-V, --version    Prints version information

ARGS:
<FILE>    Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted

Subcommand wkd

Interacts with Web Key Directories

USAGE:
sq wkd [OPTIONS] <SUBCOMMAND>

FLAGS:
-h, --help    Prints help information

OPTIONS:
-p, --policy <NETWORK-POLICY>
Sets the network policy to use [default: encrypted]  [possible
values: offline, anonymized, encrypted, insecure]

SUBCOMMANDS:
generate    Generates a Web Key Directory for the given domain and keys.
If the WKD exists, the new keys will be inserted and it is
updated and existing ones will be updated.
get         Queries for certs using Web Key Directory
help        Prints this message or the help of the given subcommand(s)
url         Prints the Web Key Directory URL of an email address.

Subcommand wkd generate

Generates a Web Key Directory for the given domain and keys.  If the WKD exists,
the new keys will be inserted and it is updated and existing ones will be
updated.

USAGE:
sq wkd generate [FLAGS] <WEB-ROOT> <FQDN> [CERT-RING]

FLAGS:
-d, --direct-method
Uses the direct method [default: advanced method]

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


ARGS:
<WEB-ROOT>
Writes the WKD to WEB-ROOT. Transfer this directory to the
webserver.
<FQDN>
Generates a WKD for FQDN

<CERT-RING>
Adds certificates from CERT-RING to the WKD

Subcommand wkd get

Queries for certs using Web Key Directory

USAGE:
sq wkd get [FLAGS] <ADDRESS>

FLAGS:
-B, --binary     Emits binary data
-h, --help       Prints help information
-V, --version    Prints version information

ARGS:
<ADDRESS>    Queries a cert for ADDRESS

Subcommand wkd url

Prints the Web Key Directory URL of an email address.

USAGE:
sq wkd url <ADDRESS>

FLAGS:
-h, --help       Prints help information
-V, --version    Prints version information

ARGS:
<ADDRESS>    Queries for ADDRESS

Subcommand armor

Converts binary to ASCII

To make encrypted data easier to handle and transport, OpenPGP data
can be transformed to an ASCII representation called ASCII Armor.  sq
emits armored data by default, but this subcommand can be used to
convert existing OpenPGP data to its ASCII-encoded representation.

The converse operation is "sq dearmor".

USAGE:
sq armor [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information


OPTIONS:
--label <LABEL>
Selects the kind of armor header [default: auto]  [possible values:
auto, message, cert, key, sig, file]
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Convert a binary certificate to ASCII
$ sq armor binary-juliet.pgp

# Convert a binary message to ASCII
$ sq armor binary-message.pgp

Subcommand dearmor

Converts ASCII to binary

To make encrypted data easier to handle and transport, OpenPGP data
can be transformed to an ASCII representation called ASCII Armor.  sq
transparently handles armored data, but this subcommand can be used to
explicitly convert existing ASCII-encoded OpenPGP data to its binary
representation.

The converse operation is "sq armor".

USAGE:
sq dearmor [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Convert a ASCII certificate to binary
$ sq dearmor ascii-juliet.pgp

# Convert a ASCII message to binary
$ sq dearmor ascii-message.pgp

Subcommand inspect

Inspects data, like file(1)

It is often difficult to tell from cursory inspection using cat(1) or
file(1) what kind of OpenPGP one is looking at.  This subcommand
inspects the data and provides a meaningful human-readable description
of it.

USAGE:
sq inspect [FLAGS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
--certifications
Prints third-party certifications

-h, --help
Prints help information


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Inspects a certificate
$ sq inspect juliet.pgp

# Inspects a certificate ring
$ sq inspect certs.pgp

# Inspects a message
$ sq inspect message.pgp

# Inspects a detached signature
$ sq inspect message.sig

Subcommand packet


Low-level packet manipulation

An OpenPGP data stream consists of packets.  These tools allow working
with packet streams.  They are mostly of interest to developers, but
"sq packet dump" may be helpful to a wider audience both to provide
valuable information in bug reports to OpenPGP-related software, and
as a learning tool.

USAGE:
sq packet <SUBCOMMAND>

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information


SUBCOMMANDS:
dump       Lists packets
decrypt    Unwraps an encryption container
split      Splits a message into packets
join       Joins packets split across files
help       Prints this message or the help of the given subcommand(s)

Subcommand packet dump


Lists packets

Creates a human-readable description of the packet sequence.
Additionally, it can print cryptographic artifacts, and print the raw
octet stream similar to hexdump(1), annotating specifically which
bytes are parsed into OpenPGP values.

To inspect encrypted messages, either supply the session key, or see
"sq decrypt --dump" or "sq packet decrypt".

USAGE:
sq packet dump [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information

-x, --hex
Prints a hexdump

--mpis
Prints cryptographic artifacts

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

--session-key <SESSION-KEY>
Decrypts an encrypted message using SESSION-KEY


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Prints the packets of a certificate
$ sq packet dump juliet.pgp

# Prints cryptographic artifacts of a certificate
$ sq packet dump --mpis juliet.pgp

# Prints a hexdump of a certificate
$ sq packet dump --hex juliet.pgp

# Prints the packets of an encrypted message
$ sq packet dump --session-key AAAABBBBCCCC... ciphertext.pgp

Subcommand packet decrypt


Unwraps an encryption container

Decrypts a message, dumping the content of the encryption container
without further processing.  The result is a valid OpenPGP message
that can, among other things, be inspected using "sq packet dump".

USAGE:
sq packet decrypt [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [--] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

--dump-session-key
Prints the session key to stderr

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted

--recipient-key <KEY>...
Decrypts the message with KEY


ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Unwraps the encryption revealing the signed message
$ sq packet decrypt --recipient-key juliet.pgp ciphertext.pgp

Subcommand packet split


Splits a message into packets

Splitting a packet sequence into individual packets, then recombining
them freely with "sq packet join" is a great way to experiment with
OpenPGP data.

The converse operation is "sq packet join".

USAGE:
sq packet split [OPTIONS] [FILE]

FLAGS:
-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
-p, --prefix <PREFIX>
Writes to files with PREFIX [defaults: FILE a dash, or "output" if
read from stdin)

ARGS:
<FILE>
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Split a certificate into individual packets
$ sq packet split juliet.pgp

Subcommand packet join


Joins packets split across files

Splitting a packet sequence into individual packets, then recombining
them freely with "sq packet join" is a great way to experiment with
OpenPGP data.

The converse operation is "sq packet split".

USAGE:
sq packet join [FLAGS] [OPTIONS] [FILE]...

FLAGS:
-B, --binary
Emits binary data

-h, --help
Prints help information

-V, --version
Prints version information


OPTIONS:
--label <LABEL>
Selects the kind of armor header [default: auto]  [possible values:
auto, message, cert, key, sig, file]
-o, --output <FILE>
Writes to FILE or stdout if omitted


ARGS:
<FILE>...
Reads from FILE or stdin if omitted


EXAMPLES:

# Split a certificate into individual packets
$ sq packet split juliet.pgp

# Then join only a subset of these packets
$ sq packet join juliet.pgp-[0-3]*