lazy-static-include 2.1.0

This crate provides `lazy_static_include_bytes` and `lazy_static_include_str` macros to replace `include_bytes` and `include_str` macros.

Lazy Static Include

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This crate provides lazy_static_include_bytes and lazy_static_include_str macros to replace include_bytes and include_str macros.

Why should we do that? Because the original include_bytes and include_str macros bring extra data from files into the compiled executable binary file, the time for compiling surges.

High compilation time is detrimental to software development. lazy_static_include_bytes and lazy_static_include_str macros can help you lazy load data from files when you are not using the release profile. In other words, if you are using include_bytes and include_str macros, and you think your compilation time is too high to wait, you can choose to use lazy_static_include_bytes and lazy_static_include_str macros.

lazy_static_include_bytes and lazy_static_include_str macros include data from files into the compiled executable binary file only when you are using the release profile. Be careful when you distribute your program.

The paths used for lazy_static_include_bytes and lazy_static_include_str are relative to CARGO_MANIFEST_DIR.

Examples

#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static_include;
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static;

lazy_static_include_str!(TEST, "data/test.txt");
lazy_static_include_str!(pub TEST2, "data/test-2.txt");

assert_eq!("This is just a test text.", TEST);
assert_eq!(TEST2, "Some text...");
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static_include;
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static;

lazy_static_include_bytes!(TEST, "data/test.txt", "data/test-2.txt");

assert_eq!("This is just a test text.".as_bytes(), TEST[0]);
assert_eq!(TEST[1], "Some text...".as_bytes());

You should notice that the struct created from lazy_static_include_bytes and lazy_static_include_str macros isn't equal to &'static [u8] or &'static str. If you want to get an exact &'static [u8] or &'static str reference, you need to dereference the struct.

#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static_include;
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static;

lazy_static_include_bytes!(TEST, "data/test.txt");

let data: &'static [u8] = *TEST;

If you include str and bytes from multiple files, after dereferencing the struct, you will get a Vec<&'static [u8]> or a Vec<&'static str>. In order to not move out of borrowed content, use &* to get the reference of that Vec.

#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static_include;
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static;

lazy_static_include_str!(TEST, "data/test.txt", "data/test-2.txt");

let v: &Vec<&'static str> = &*TEST;

Include Array

There is a special macro lazy_static_include_array which can include arrays from files. The array is fixed sized and can be one of these following types: bool, char, usize, u8, u16, u32, u64, u128, isize, i8, i16, i32, i64, i128, f32, f64, &'static str.

Also, the lazy_static_include_array macro includes data from files into the compiled executable binary file only when you are using the release profile. Be careful when you distribute your program.

#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static_include;
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static;

lazy_static_include_array!(TEST: [u64; 5], "data/u64_array.txt");
assert_eq!(123, TEST[0]);
assert_eq!(456, TEST[1]);
assert_eq!(789, TEST[2]);
assert_eq!(1000, TEST[3]);
assert_eq!(500000000000u64, TEST[4]);
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static_include;
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static;

lazy_static_include_array!(TEST: [i32; 5], "data/i32_array.txt", "data/i32_array-2.txt");
assert_eq!(123, TEST[0][0]);
assert_eq!(-456, TEST[0][1]);
assert_eq!(789, TEST[0][2]);
assert_eq!(1000, TEST[0][3]);
assert_eq!(5000, TEST[0][4]);

assert_eq!(-1, TEST[1][0]);
assert_eq!(-2, TEST[1][1]);
assert_eq!(-3, TEST[1][2]);
assert_eq!(-4, TEST[1][3]);
assert_eq!(-5, TEST[1][4]);
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static_include;
#[macro_use] extern crate lazy_static;

lazy_static_include_array!(pub TEST: [&'static str; 3], "data/string_array.txt");

assert_eq!("Hi", TEST[0]);
assert_eq!("Hello", TEST[1]);
assert_eq!("哈囉", TEST[2]);

No Std

This crate can work without std, but the lazy_static_include_array macro will be disabled unless using the release profile.

Enable the feature no_std to compile this crate without std.

[dependencies.lazy-static-include]
version = "*"
features = ["no_std"]
default-features = false

Benchmark

Using static mechanisms makes your program faster. See my benchmark result below (Intel i7-6700HQ, ran on 2019/07/16):

test include_array_lazy_static   ... bench:          43 ns/iter (+/- 3)
test include_array_native_static ... bench:          46 ns/iter (+/- 4)
test include_array_no_static     ... bench:      29,714 ns/iter (+/- 1,156)
test include_bytes_lazy_static   ... bench:         382 ns/iter (+/- 63)
test include_bytes_native_static ... bench:         380 ns/iter (+/- 30)
test include_bytes_no_static     ... bench:       9,076 ns/iter (+/- 1,224)
test include_str_lazy_static     ... bench:         932 ns/iter (+/- 103)
test include_str_native_static   ... bench:         937 ns/iter (+/- 25)
test include_str_no_static       ... bench:      10,135 ns/iter (+/- 1,634)

When using the release profile, the performance of lazy_static_include_* is very close to include_*. That means you don't need to worry about the overhead, but just enjoy the faster compilation time.

You can run the benchmark program by executing,

cargo bench

Crates.io

https://crates.io/crates/lazy-static-include

Documentation

https://docs.rs/lazy-static-include

License

MIT