Struct hyper::header::ContentEncoding [] [src]

pub struct ContentEncoding(pub Vec<Encoding>);

Content-Encoding header, defined in RFC7231

The Content-Encoding header field indicates what content codings have been applied to the representation, beyond those inherent in the media type, and thus what decoding mechanisms have to be applied in order to obtain data in the media type referenced by the Content-Type header field. Content-Encoding is primarily used to allow a representation's data to be compressed without losing the identity of its underlying media type.

ABNF

Content-Encoding = 1#content-coding

Example values

Examples

use hyper::header::{Headers, ContentEncoding, Encoding};
 
let mut headers = Headers::new();
headers.set(ContentEncoding(vec![Encoding::Chunked]));
use hyper::header::{Headers, ContentEncoding, Encoding};
 
let mut headers = Headers::new();
headers.set(
    ContentEncoding(vec![
        Encoding::Gzip,
        Encoding::Chunked,
    ])
);

Methods from Deref<Target = Vec<Encoding>>

1.0.0
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Returns the number of elements the vector can hold without reallocating.

Examples

let vec: Vec<i32> = Vec::with_capacity(10);
assert_eq!(vec.capacity(), 10);

1.0.0
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Reserves capacity for at least additional more elements to be inserted in the given Vec<T>. The collection may reserve more space to avoid frequent reallocations. After calling reserve, capacity will be greater than or equal to self.len() + additional. Does nothing if capacity is already sufficient.

Panics

Panics if the new capacity overflows usize.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1];
vec.reserve(10);
assert!(vec.capacity() >= 11);

1.0.0
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Reserves the minimum capacity for exactly additional more elements to be inserted in the given Vec<T>. After calling reserve_exact, capacity will be greater than or equal to self.len() + additional. Does nothing if the capacity is already sufficient.

Note that the allocator may give the collection more space than it requests. Therefore capacity can not be relied upon to be precisely minimal. Prefer reserve if future insertions are expected.

Panics

Panics if the new capacity overflows usize.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1];
vec.reserve_exact(10);
assert!(vec.capacity() >= 11);

1.0.0
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Shrinks the capacity of the vector as much as possible.

It will drop down as close as possible to the length but the allocator may still inform the vector that there is space for a few more elements.

Examples

let mut vec = Vec::with_capacity(10);
vec.extend([1, 2, 3].iter().cloned());
assert_eq!(vec.capacity(), 10);
vec.shrink_to_fit();
assert!(vec.capacity() >= 3);

1.0.0
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Converts the vector into Box<[T]>.

Note that this will drop any excess capacity. Calling this and converting back to a vector with into_vec is equivalent to calling shrink_to_fit.

Examples

let v = vec![1, 2, 3];

let slice = v.into_boxed_slice();

Any excess capacity is removed:

let mut vec = Vec::with_capacity(10);
vec.extend([1, 2, 3].iter().cloned());

assert_eq!(vec.capacity(), 10);
let slice = vec.into_boxed_slice();
assert_eq!(slice.into_vec().capacity(), 3);

1.0.0
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Shortens the vector, keeping the first len elements and dropping the rest.

If len is greater than the vector's current length, this has no effect.

The drain method can emulate truncate, but causes the excess elements to be returned instead of dropped.

Note that this method has no effect on the allocated capacity of the vector.

Examples

Truncating a five element vector to two elements:

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
vec.truncate(2);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2]);

No truncation occurs when len is greater than the vector's current length:

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3];
vec.truncate(8);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2, 3]);

Truncating when len == 0 is equivalent to calling the clear method.

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3];
vec.truncate(0);
assert_eq!(vec, []);

1.7.0
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Extracts a slice containing the entire vector.

Equivalent to &s[..].

Examples

use std::io::{self, Write};
let buffer = vec![1, 2, 3, 5, 8];
io::sink().write(buffer.as_slice()).unwrap();

1.7.0
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Extracts a mutable slice of the entire vector.

Equivalent to &mut s[..].

Examples

use std::io::{self, Read};
let mut buffer = vec![0; 3];
io::repeat(0b101).read_exact(buffer.as_mut_slice()).unwrap();

1.0.0
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Sets the length of a vector.

This will explicitly set the size of the vector, without actually modifying its buffers, so it is up to the caller to ensure that the vector is actually the specified size.

Examples

use std::ptr;

let mut vec = vec!['r', 'u', 's', 't'];

unsafe {
    ptr::drop_in_place(&mut vec[3]);
    vec.set_len(3);
}
assert_eq!(vec, ['r', 'u', 's']);

In this example, there is a memory leak since the memory locations owned by the inner vectors were not freed prior to the set_len call:

let mut vec = vec![vec![1, 0, 0],
                   vec![0, 1, 0],
                   vec![0, 0, 1]];
unsafe {
    vec.set_len(0);
}

In this example, the vector gets expanded from zero to four items without any memory allocations occurring, resulting in vector values of unallocated memory:

let mut vec: Vec<char> = Vec::new();

unsafe {
    vec.set_len(4);
}

1.0.0
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Removes an element from the vector and returns it.

The removed element is replaced by the last element of the vector.

This does not preserve ordering, but is O(1).

Panics

Panics if index is out of bounds.

Examples

let mut v = vec!["foo", "bar", "baz", "qux"];

assert_eq!(v.swap_remove(1), "bar");
assert_eq!(v, ["foo", "qux", "baz"]);

assert_eq!(v.swap_remove(0), "foo");
assert_eq!(v, ["baz", "qux"]);

1.0.0
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Inserts an element at position index within the vector, shifting all elements after it to the right.

Panics

Panics if index is out of bounds.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3];
vec.insert(1, 4);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 4, 2, 3]);
vec.insert(4, 5);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 4, 2, 3, 5]);

1.0.0
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Removes and returns the element at position index within the vector, shifting all elements after it to the left.

Panics

Panics if index is out of bounds.

Examples

let mut v = vec![1, 2, 3];
assert_eq!(v.remove(1), 2);
assert_eq!(v, [1, 3]);

1.0.0
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Retains only the elements specified by the predicate.

In other words, remove all elements e such that f(&e) returns false. This method operates in place and preserves the order of the retained elements.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3, 4];
vec.retain(|&x| x%2 == 0);
assert_eq!(vec, [2, 4]);

1.16.0
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Removes all but the first of consecutive elements in the vector that resolve to the same key.

If the vector is sorted, this removes all duplicates.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![10, 20, 21, 30, 20];

vec.dedup_by_key(|i| *i / 10);

assert_eq!(vec, [10, 20, 30, 20]);

1.16.0
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Removes all but the first of consecutive elements in the vector satisfying a given equality relation.

The same_bucket function is passed references to two elements from the vector, and returns true if the elements compare equal, or false if they do not. The elements are passed in opposite order from their order in the vector, so if same_bucket(a, b) returns true, a is removed.

If the vector is sorted, this removes all duplicates.

Examples

use std::ascii::AsciiExt;

let mut vec = vec!["foo", "bar", "Bar", "baz", "bar"];

vec.dedup_by(|a, b| a.eq_ignore_ascii_case(b));

assert_eq!(vec, ["foo", "bar", "baz", "bar"]);

1.0.0
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Appends an element to the back of a collection.

Panics

Panics if the number of elements in the vector overflows a usize.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1, 2];
vec.push(3);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2, 3]);

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🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (collection_placement)

placement protocol is subject to change

Returns a place for insertion at the back of the Vec.

Using this method with placement syntax is equivalent to push, but may be more efficient.

Examples

#![feature(collection_placement)]
#![feature(placement_in_syntax)]

let mut vec = vec![1, 2];
vec.place_back() <- 3;
vec.place_back() <- 4;
assert_eq!(&vec, &[1, 2, 3, 4]);

1.0.0
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Removes the last element from a vector and returns it, or None if it is empty.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3];
assert_eq!(vec.pop(), Some(3));
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2]);

1.4.0
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Moves all the elements of other into Self, leaving other empty.

Panics

Panics if the number of elements in the vector overflows a usize.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3];
let mut vec2 = vec![4, 5, 6];
vec.append(&mut vec2);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]);
assert_eq!(vec2, []);

1.6.0
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Creates a draining iterator that removes the specified range in the vector and yields the removed items.

Note 1: The element range is removed even if the iterator is only partially consumed or not consumed at all.

Note 2: It is unspecified how many elements are removed from the vector if the Drain value is leaked.

Panics

Panics if the starting point is greater than the end point or if the end point is greater than the length of the vector.

Examples

let mut v = vec![1, 2, 3];
let u: Vec<_> = v.drain(1..).collect();
assert_eq!(v, &[1]);
assert_eq!(u, &[2, 3]);

// A full range clears the vector
v.drain(..);
assert_eq!(v, &[]);

1.0.0
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Clears the vector, removing all values.

Note that this method has no effect on the allocated capacity of the vector.

Examples

let mut v = vec![1, 2, 3];

v.clear();

assert!(v.is_empty());

1.0.0
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Returns the number of elements in the vector, also referred to as its 'length'.

Examples

let a = vec![1, 2, 3];
assert_eq!(a.len(), 3);

1.0.0
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Returns true if the vector contains no elements.

Examples

let mut v = Vec::new();
assert!(v.is_empty());

v.push(1);
assert!(!v.is_empty());

1.4.0
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Splits the collection into two at the given index.

Returns a newly allocated Self. self contains elements [0, at), and the returned Self contains elements [at, len).

Note that the capacity of self does not change.

Panics

Panics if at > len.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1,2,3];
let vec2 = vec.split_off(1);
assert_eq!(vec, [1]);
assert_eq!(vec2, [2, 3]);

1.5.0
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Resizes the Vec in-place so that len is equal to new_len.

If new_len is greater than len, the Vec is extended by the difference, with each additional slot filled with value. If new_len is less than len, the Vec is simply truncated.

This method requires Clone to clone the passed value. If you'd rather create a value with Default instead, see resize_default.

Examples

let mut vec = vec!["hello"];
vec.resize(3, "world");
assert_eq!(vec, ["hello", "world", "world"]);

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3, 4];
vec.resize(2, 0);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2]);

1.6.0
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Clones and appends all elements in a slice to the Vec.

Iterates over the slice other, clones each element, and then appends it to this Vec. The other vector is traversed in-order.

Note that this function is same as extend except that it is specialized to work with slices instead. If and when Rust gets specialization this function will likely be deprecated (but still available).

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1];
vec.extend_from_slice(&[2, 3, 4]);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2, 3, 4]);

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🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (vec_resize_default)

Resizes the Vec in-place so that len is equal to new_len.

If new_len is greater than len, the Vec is extended by the difference, with each additional slot filled with Default::default(). If new_len is less than len, the Vec is simply truncated.

This method uses Default to create new values on every push. If you'd rather Clone a given value, use resize.

Examples

#![feature(vec_resize_default)]

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3];
vec.resize_default(5);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2, 3, 0, 0]);

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3, 4];
vec.resize_default(2);
assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2]);

1.0.0
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Removes consecutive repeated elements in the vector.

If the vector is sorted, this removes all duplicates.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 2, 3, 2];

vec.dedup();

assert_eq!(vec, [1, 2, 3, 2]);

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🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (vec_remove_item)

recently added

Removes the first instance of item from the vector if the item exists.

Examples

let mut vec = vec![1, 2, 3, 1];

vec.remove_item(&1);

assert_eq!(vec, vec![2, 3, 1]);

1.22.0
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Creates a splicing iterator that replaces the specified range in the vector with the given replace_with iterator and yields the removed items. replace_with does not need to be the same length as range.

Note 1: The element range is removed even if the iterator is not consumed until the end.

Note 2: It is unspecified how many elements are removed from the vector, if the Splice value is leaked.

Note 3: The input iterator replace_with is only consumed when the Splice value is dropped.

Note 4: This is optimal if:

  • The tail (elements in the vector after range) is empty,
  • or replace_with yields fewer elements than range’s length
  • or the lower bound of its size_hint() is exact.

Otherwise, a temporary vector is allocated and the tail is moved twice.

Panics

Panics if the starting point is greater than the end point or if the end point is greater than the length of the vector.

Examples

let mut v = vec![1, 2, 3];
let new = [7, 8];
let u: Vec<_> = v.splice(..2, new.iter().cloned()).collect();
assert_eq!(v, &[7, 8, 3]);
assert_eq!(u, &[1, 2]);

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🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (drain_filter)

recently added

Creates an iterator which uses a closure to determine if an element should be removed.

If the closure returns true, then the element is removed and yielded. If the closure returns false, it will try again, and call the closure on the next element, seeing if it passes the test.

Using this method is equivalent to the following code:

let mut i = 0;
while i != vec.len() {
    if some_predicate(&mut vec[i]) {
        let val = vec.remove(i);
        // your code here
    } else {
        i += 1;
    }
}

But drain_filter is easier to use. drain_filter is also more efficient, because it can backshift the elements of the array in bulk.

Note that drain_filter also lets you mutate every element in the filter closure, regardless of whether you choose to keep or remove it.

Examples

Splitting an array into evens and odds, reusing the original allocation:

#![feature(drain_filter)]
let mut numbers = vec![1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15];

let evens = numbers.drain_filter(|x| *x % 2 == 0).collect::<Vec<_>>();
let odds = numbers;

assert_eq!(evens, vec![2, 4, 6, 8, 14]);
assert_eq!(odds, vec![1, 3, 5, 9, 11, 13, 15]);

Trait Implementations

impl Clone for ContentEncoding
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Returns a copy of the value. Read more

1.0.0
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Performs copy-assignment from source. Read more

impl Debug for ContentEncoding
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Formats the value using the given formatter.

impl PartialEq for ContentEncoding
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This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==. Read more

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This method tests for !=.

impl Deref for ContentEncoding
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The resulting type after dereferencing.

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Dereferences the value.

impl DerefMut for ContentEncoding
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Mutably dereferences the value.

impl Header for ContentEncoding
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Returns the name of the header field this belongs to. Read more

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Parse a header from a raw stream of bytes. Read more

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Format a header to outgoing stream. Read more

impl Display for ContentEncoding
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Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more