internationalization 0.0.3

Easy to use I18n
Documentation
# Internationalization

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An simple compile time i18n implementation in Rust.
It throws a compilation error if the translation key is not present, but since the `lang` argument is dynamic it will panic if the language has not been added for the matching key.

> API documentation [https://crates.io/crates/internationalization](https://crates.io/crates/internationalization)

## Usage

Have a `locales/` folder somewhere in your app, root, src, anywhere. with `.json` files, nested in folders or not.
It uses a glob pattern: `**/locales/**/*.json` to match your translation files.

the files must look like this:

```json
{
  "err.user.not_found": {
    "fr": "Utilisateur introuvable: $email, $id",
    "en": "User not found: $email, $id"
  },
  "err.answer.all": {
    "fr": "Échec lors de la récupération des réponses",
    "en": "Failed to retrieve answers"
  },
  "err.answer.delete.failed": {
    "fr": "Échec lors de la suppression de la réponse",
    "en": "Failed to delete answer"
  }
}
```

Any number of languages can be added, but you should provide them for everything since it will panic if a language is not found when queried for a key.

In your app, jsut call the `t!` macro

```rust
fn main() {
    let lang = "en";
    let res = t!("err.not_allowed", lang);

    assert_eq!("You are not allowed to do this", res);
}
```

You can use interpolation, any number of argument is OK but you should note that they have to be sorted alphabetically.
To use variables, call the `t!` macro like this:

```rust
fn main() {
    let lang = "en";
    let res = t!("err.user.not_found", email: "me@localhost", id: "1", lang);

    assert_eq!("User not found: me@localhost, ID: 1", res);
}
```

## Installation

Internationalization is available on [crates.io](https://crates.io/crates/internationalization), include it in your `Cargo.toml`:

```toml
[dependencies]
internationalization = "0.0.2"
```

Then include it in your code like this:

```rust
#[macro_use]
extern crate internationalization;
```

Or use the macro where you want to use it:

```rust
use internationalization::t;
```

## Note

Internationalization will not work if no `PWD` env var is set at compile time.